Skip to content

German Soft Pretzels: Laugenbrezeln

This is most likely going to be the most patriotic post I will ever write ;) Pretzels – or Brezeln, as we call them –  have made their way around the world yet it’s one of the things people will always associate with Germany. When I search “German man” or “German woman” on Google Images most results show people in traditional Bavarian clothing, with a massive glass of beer and a Pretzel.

German Baking Culture

In Germany there are about 300 different types of bread. We love bread and we’re really good at making it (not me personally, I’m actually quite bad at it but I’m being patriotic here).

I often wonder how non-Germans perceive German bakeries when visiting my home country. Do they feel it’s over-the-top? Does the food look tasty to them?  If not, why have they not adopted it? Has anyone ever tried to introduce the concept to other countries? So many questions!

Here’s what a typical German bakery looks like:

Source: Pinterest, saved by Karen Westbrook Link: https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/24/f0/68/24f0686d19d3aa8c568948b7aa527e97.jpg

You’ll usually find a variety of the following:

  • Different kinds of crispy bread rolls (wheat, poppy, sesame, whole grain, multi grain, rye etc.)
  • Bread (white, rye, different kinds of grain, baguette and different varieties of bauernbrot)
  • Pretzels: soft pretzels, pretzel bread sticks and pretzel-style buns – often including some varieties with cheese melted on top
  • Cheese rolls and cheese sticks
  • Assortment of prepared rolls with cheese and cold cuts
  • Variety of cakes
  • Sweet things like doughnuts, croissants, muffins, “nutty corners” etc.

Unlike the majority of bakeries in other countries, in Germany the emphasis seems to be on savoury goods rather than cakes. One of the reasons may be that we often have bread and cold cuts for dinner (Stulle mit Brot, as my parents would say). Thus, it’s perfectly normal to have bread and cold cuts twice a day.

Soft Pretzels – Laugenbrezeln

There are many different kinds of pretzels but the soft pretzel is my favourite. They’re soft (surprise!) and salty and taste magnificent with cheese and cold cuts. In German they’re called Laugenbrezeln (lye pretzel) because they’re briefly cooked in lye before baking.

To be honest, I was very surprised at how easy it was to make soft pretzels. As mentioned before, I am not very gifted when it comes to baking so I was a little apprehensive about making pretzels at home. However, there was nothing to worry about and only very little that can go wrong ;)

In addition to the traditionally shaped pretzel I usually make a few pretzel sticks/buns and some pretzel bites for variety.

Ginger and Olives - Pretzel Recipe - German Girl Cooks

Ginger and Olives - Pretzel Recipe - German Girl Cooks

Ginger and Olives - Pretzel Recipe - German Girl Cooks

Ginger and Olives - Pretzel Recipe - German Girl Cooks

Ginger and Olives - Pretzel Recipe - German Girl Cooks

Ginger and Olives - Pretzel Recipe - German Girl Cooks

 

 

 

 

 

 

Print Recipe
German Soft Pretzels: Laugenbrezeln
Ginger and Olives - Pretzel Recipe - German Girl Cooks
Cuisine German
Servings
Pretzels
Ingredients
Cuisine German
Servings
Pretzels
Ingredients
Ginger and Olives - Pretzel Recipe - German Girl Cooks
Instructions
  1. Sift the flour into a bowl and make a well in the middle.
  2. Add half of the milk to a mug and add the yeast. Stir a bit until the yeast has dissolved, then add the mix to the little well in the flour.
  3. Divide the butter into small pieces and arrange around the well with the yeast and milk mix. Cover the bowl with a towel and leave to rest for 10-15 minutes.
  4. Add the remaining milk and knead well. The longer you knead the smoother the dough ;) Leave to rest for 30 minutes in a warm place to give the dough time to rise.
  5. When the dough has risen divide it into pieces and form pretzels, buns, sticks or bites.
  6. Pre-heat the oven to 180°C.
  7. Bring the water to boil in a pot and add the baking soda. Now briefly cook the pretzels in the baking soda. Add 2-3 pretzels at a time and cook for 30-45 seconds. They should float and get a little soggy. Place on a grid to drain.
  8. Place baking paper on a tray and grease with a little butter. Arrange the pretzels on the tray and (optional) sprinkle with poppy and sesame seeds. Bake in the oven for 20-25 minutes until brown.
Recipe Notes

In Germany you can find fresh yeast cubes in the refrigerated section of any supermarket. In the UK that's not the case, however, if your supermarket has a bakery section with freshly baked goods just go and ask for some fresh yeast. We shop at Tesco and they don't even charge for it because they have too much yeast anyway.

Share this Recipe

2 Comments

  1. FABULOUS recipe for one of my favourite German bread snacks! I will try to make these soon! Karen

    • Thank you :) Hope you like them as much as I do!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *